Colombia, Vietnam, China. Do these places sound like somewhere you want to raise your child? They do to me! I’m a single dad and my 4-year-old has already lived in these countries and more. Some people ask me how do I–as a single parent digital nomad–raise my daughter?

My response is always the same: how couldn’t I?

single dad travel blog
My daughter and I in Hong Kong

Strapped with a mountain of student debt, exhausted from working two jobs morning-to-night, and thoroughly upset to return home only to see my daughter is already asleep, I was surviving in the United States, but not thriving. 

That’s when I started reading online and seeing phrases like ‘digital nomad’ and ‘travel family’ and ‘modern nomad’ and ‘location independent’ being thrown about.

I saw families like The Holcombe Family doing amazing things. 

I would think, “who are all these super-rich, ultra-privileged, narcissistic people bragging about their life with children as they go to all these amazing destinations?”

single parent travel blog
Us checking out a waterfall in Thailand

I should’ve reserved that judgment. It turns out, the nomadic life–the ‘travel family’ life–is just as attainable as the life I was living in the United States. 

That’s when I made a choice: I was going to work towards achieving what I saw as a better life for me and my daughter, the nomadic one. 

I’ve always loved travel ever since I did my study abroad in Costa Rica. But I knew the way I ‘studied’ in university was not going to look like my parenting life. 

I needed an attainable path to location independence. 

That’s when I started to work for it. I already had a skill: writing. I just needed to monetize it.

So, I started this blog with this post talking about some serious mistakes I made in my personal life.  

If want to get started with building writing as income, I suggest you also start a blog! Check out Bluehost for an awesome web hosting service!

Once I started my blog, I was able to fully engage with my choice.

The Choice of Being a Nomad

Let’s start by saying that I love the United States, and if I could afford to live there full-time on the work I do now, I would spend at least half my time there. Probably the summer in Michigan where I’m from, for example. 

single dad travel blogger
In the Upper Peninsula of Michigan

I’m not to that point yet, so the choice I made was this: if I’m going to live off my writing now, before it’s enough to live in the USA, then I have to find somewhere where I can afford to live

I felt compelled to live off my writing. Not because it gives me the chance to live nomadically, but because I love writing, and I love the work I write about. 

 

My choice was this: give up a pair of good jobs in the United States that provide economic freedom, or live a life of love and freedom of choice each day.

Both ways of living have their merits, anyone who chooses a good job in the USA is doing okay in my book, but it’s not a life I’m suited towards.

I’m not built for alarm cooks, punch cards, and bosses staring over my shoulder. That kind of stuff drives me spiritually and mentally insane and takes a massive toll on my body. 

I’m built to wake up with the sun, and then fall asleep when it does. I thrive under my own direction, and when I fail I have no one else to blame it on.

single parent travel blogger
Koh Nangyuan, just 15-30 minute boat ride from Koh Tao where we used to live

The integrity the nomadic life–and being a single parent digital nomad–has taught me keeps me driven and engaged in a way that is meaningful to me.

And, as a bonus, I love the freedom to map out each day the way I see fit. 

How does a single parent digital nomad raise his children?

I do it only by knowing it’s the best route for my daughter and me.

Her well-being is directly tied to my state-of-mind, and my state-of-mind is best when I am living a life that is self-actualizing. 

My daughter is safe, healthy, and learning so much about the world that she could never get out of a textbook in the US. 

No, I’m not making nearly as much as I once was, but I worry less about my income level on the road because it’s so much cheaper than living the US.

And I’m able to live a healthy life full of activity, delicious food, and heaps of time with my daughter. 

So if you’re curious how a single parent digital nomad can raise their children on the road, I ask you back: how can’t they?


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Are you looking for last minute gift ideas for Father’s Day?

Just because you remembered the most important guy in your life at the last minute doesn’t mean his gift needs to suck.

Honor the number one father in your life by showing him how thoughtful you are–even if it’s a white lie.

Here are 5 last minute gift ideas for Father’s Day this year!

*affiliate links present; they’re no extra cost to you, but a purchase through the link supports my blog 🙂 read the full disclosure here.

1. Kindles are on sale!

From up to 10 HD inches of glorious Android tablet games, videos, apps, and more are now starting at just $39.99!

2. Sunglasses for the summer.

I love this pair of Rayban Aviators.

And this pair of Rayban Justin RB4165. These. Are. Lit.

3. Gamer dads will love this.

VR has seen a significant price drop over the years. Here’s an affordable Samsung VR headset that offers heaps and piles of games to play for dads who love to game!

 4. Your gift might be late, but it can still be the BEST!

If you’re worried about your thoughtlessness impacting the quality of the gift, then invest in this bad boy! It’s a DJI Mavic Air and every dad’s best friend.

Seriously, he’ll freak out. I would. *Hint hint* to anyone out there who wants to show how much they love me 😛

 

5. For dads who work a lot.

Some dads work, all day, every day. They need work tools. Provide them.

This external hard drive holds 8 TB!

Everyone loves this Logitech mouse.

This webcam is straight up professional.

Father’s Day is an important day to acknowledge a person who has committed to his children in a way that is meaningful, responsible, and most of all, loving.

Father’s Day is really about celebrating the entire family, but it’s also a perfect day to let your dad, husband, brother, son, uncle, grandfather, or best friend know that you respect the work he does as a parent.

Get him one of these awesome gifts and he’ll love it. Even if you did only remember to buy it at the last minute.


If you liked this article, SUBSCRIBE to the mailing list below for more ideas, tips, and free offers on upcoming books of mine!